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Barn Owls

Sitting at the breakfast bar yesterday morning and was greeted by the wonderful sight of a Barn Owl swooping over the field at the back of our garden. The finale was it then perching in our tree and then on our fence.

It is this sort of thing that makes me remember how blessed we are living here.

Comments

Showing 1 - 25 of 56
Alan P
Quite agree with that Colin.  I was standing in my back garden yesterday morning admiring the field of clean white untouched snow when I saw out of the corner of my eye a Seagull hovering over my pond.  It then landed in the pond and started to drink.  I was standing no more than five feet away.  I have lived here for eleven years now and have always seen Seagulls flying over the field but I think the combination of the bad weather and the fact a tree in the garden has been cut right back led to this bird so desperate for a drink to throw caution to the wind as they do not usually come into the garden. It had just started to make it's self at home when my cat noticed it and decided to have a closer look. The bird did not see her on her first charge but did on the second and made a hasty retreat.
June H
Colin, you are really lucky to have seen the Owl, I love those birds, we have a variety of birds visiting our gardenI , spending a lot of time chasing the sparrow hawks off of the little birds, not always sucessful I'm afraid, but I do get a lot of pleasure watching my feathered friends, Colin, did you manage to photograph your Owl visitor ? trouble is, at least movement by the window, with the camera, most of the birds take off,, we are keeping the seed and nut holders fillled, also the fat ball container topped up, and by the amount of visitors we get, very much apprieciated.
Travelling Man
We oft see the Owl, June. I am not sure where he roosts and I am also pretty certain there is more than just one. But as is so often the case, when there is a picture to be had there is no camera to hand! I will try and remedy that as far as our Owl is concerned.

What we have noticed is that sometimes he is over the fields at the back and sometimes the fields at the front. And then he will vanish for quite long periods and we think we have lost him.

We also benefit from a lot of birdlife and have an entertaining colony of hedge sparrows that live in an ancient hedge that borders one side of our garden. I do maintain the hedge but keep it wildlife friendly. I have to agree with Alan P, the birds get very "brave" during this weather.
Anthony G
I have 12 large(very) oak trees in my garden and this year I intend setting up two owl boxes I have observed a couple (male,femail?) barn owls over the past year and will try to attract them to a nest box.
Problem will be to get the boxes high enough, any suggestions/help would be appreciated.
June H
Anthony, very much tongue in cheek,  skyhooks  ? no, serously, if there any tree surgeons out there, that might be able to do a very good turn for natural wildlife, and Anthony, just get your ladders out, to maybe give some owls a safe nesting home.I know that there is bound to be some nice kind person out there who will gladly help, in anticipation, bless you , whoever you are.
Theresa S
We feel very priviledged to witness some of the wildlife wonders of the area we live.  It is very special place and should be maintained for future generations.  I have been lucky enough to get some wonderful photos of our wildlife that visis our garden and the surrounding fields.  We never know what might turn up.

A few years back we was lucky enough to have a Hoopoe in our gaden, sadly no camera to hand at the time.  I have been lucky enough to photograph our Barn Owl on two occasions.  I had been out to take photos of the snow laying on the fields, just turned round and the Barn owl was flying towards me.  Another time one had decided to rest up in our garden, so a perfect opportunity.
Janet E
I have had a fieldfare visiting my garden these last few days and it is great watching all the birds enjoying the bird feeders, keeps me busy filling them. How lucky to see the barn owls.
Rosa
Great to see that you have had a fieldfare in your garden, As you may now they are from the thrush family and love to feed on berries which are now in short supply. We have been putting out apples as well as bird seed and fatballs and have also been lucky enough to attract a few to our garden
Travelling Man
One (and it is but one) of the great things about living here is the wildlife and the feathered type in particular. No matter whether I am in the garden, out on the boat or just walking there is always something wonderful to see.

When moving here I had a difficult choice to make - the gentle landscape of Norfolk or the wild hills of the West/South West. It was not an easy choice but I am happy to be here (although I do go West side every so often)
John B
this time of year there are a great number of migrating birds to see in this area.  I am an amateur ornithologist , but moving to Norfolk has helped me to see alot more differant types of birds.
Rosa
Don't forget  the Big Garden Bird Watch this weekend. - the time of year when we are asked to count the birds you see at any one time. Look at the RSPB website for more information.

Let's hope numbers aren't down following the dreadful weather we have had over the last few weeks..
Travelling Man
Not only saw the Barn Owl today (was on our fence) but when it took of it has a mid-air collision with our local Hawk. No damage to either fortunately.

And just to make the day complete - saw the first Snowdrops.
June H
Great to see anything like that Colin, I wish that I could be so lucky, today, although it was so bitterly cold, stirred myself to make sure all the seed feeders are well filled, lots of fat balls in position, along with the half coconut shells filled with suety fat, which I bought at Lathams, ar Potter , higham, cheapest place I know for wild bird food , today, I saw the first Green finches, just two of them, but, we have lots of long tailed tits, and,goldfinches, blue tits,( chafinches, just two of those), starlings, black birds, and the usual group of wood pigeons, and a few collared doves, and, one little pied wagtail, bless him, pecking up the seed that the, others drop, our bird table is well stocked, in case we get that extra deluge of snow that has been promised,
So let it snow, we are ready for it in Ludham, all the best everyone.
Theresa S
June H, so thats where the goldfinches have got to !  We have not had any in our garden for quite a few months now.
Anthony G
Does anybody know of barn owls eat cats!
Theresa S
They eat small rodents.
Travelling Man
I agree with Theresa, Anthony. They love small rodents - mice, voles etc and cannot manage much bigger prey.. Why did you think they might eat cats?
Anthony G
What about Marmite?
June H
Well Anthony, what about Marmite ? I do like a teaspoon of it in hot water, lovely warming drink, and being a veggie, it is one drink that I do like, but, what has this got to do with wildlife ?
Susan C
So hello,  we are  new to this........We have only lived in Potter Heigham for 11 months, we love it so much.  You lot are so lovely .................
I see a beautiful Owl most days, she flies past my kitchen window, back and forth, I feel blessed to see her, sometimes she is with a mate.
June H
Hi Susan, we have lived in Ludham for getting on for 18 years, we found Norfolk while going on holiday, hireing boats,a couple of times a year when we could afford it, I was born in London, and the lovely folk here, are like they were then, when I was growing up, there is no way that I could move back, I am a real old wrinkly, 75 this year, so, I feel a bit out of it with all you cool guys !!, welcome to the group Susan, x.
Travelling Man
Where in Potter are you, Susan? We live in Marsh Road so it might be the same owl.
Travelling Man
June H, there is no age limit to being cool :-)
John B
I moved up from london 14 months ago to potter, live in Mill road. love it here.

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